Coyote Connections III

Posted on July 16th, 2017 by Anne Garland

The Guardian
The Guardian, oil on board, 24″ x 18″ © 2017

Coyotte Connections III

JULY 10 – AUGUST 4, 2017
Midcoast Conservancy
36 Water Street
Wiscasset, Maine
Monday-Friday 10-4

This is the third in series of exhibitions that feature artwork celebrating the life and spirit of our native coyote. Through drawings, prints and paintings, their play, pain, and joy is expressed, as well as the crucial role they play in a healthy ecosystem, their invaluable connection to the land, other wildlife, and humans.

ART WALK JULY 27 FROM 5:00 TO 8:00
Curator and Conservation Biologist Geri Vistein
will be present to answer all your questions about coyotes
and how we can co-exist together.

FMI: 207-389-5150 or www.midcoastconservancy.org

Art Celebrates Place

Posted on March 31st, 2017 by Anne Garland

Hayes Farm, 12" x 24", oil on panel
Hayes Farm, oil on panel, 12″ x 24″

Hayes Farm

The autumn of 2016 was especially brilliant. It set the Hayes field and surrounding mountains ablaze like a torch. In every direction there was inspiration to paint. I finally settled into a view that has been familiar to me since childhood: a place from the Iron Mountain trail where one can pause and gaze over the breadth of open field, to the generations-old house tucked into the landscape, and the rugged mountain ranges beyond. That lofty mountainside is a special place to be. I give thanks for the generous sharing and protection of this land, which will continue to be enjoyed long after I am gone.

ART CELEBRATES PLACE

Upper Saco Valley Land Trust Presents the 8th Annual Opening of Art Celebrates Place
A Show by Local Artists Inspired by Historic Farms
Tin Mountain Conservation Center
1245 Bald Hill Road, Albany, NH 

April 7th – May 31st, 2017

ARTISTS’ RECEPTION

FRIDAY APRIL 7, 2017, 5:00-7:30pm
with locally sourced refreshments, raffle & place-based performances starting at 6pm.

FMI: 603-447-6991 or www.tinmountain.org

The Printed Pattern: 3 Printmakers Collaborate

Posted on December 7th, 2016 by Anne Garland

1st generation: Wendy
1st Generation: Wendy
2nd generation: Peggy
2nd Generation: Peggy
3rd generation: Anne
3rd Generation: Anne

The images above show an example of the evolution of a print in a collaborative project by three artists: Wendy Ketchum (wendyketchum.com), and Peggy Merritt (mvmerritt.com), and myself. We originally came together to share our ideas, processes and for camaraderie in a profession that can be isolating. Our meetings and dialogues at our studios were greatly enriching and supportive. They evolved into a large body of work, shown at the Patricia Carrega Gallery (patricialaddcarega.com) this past summer. The exhibition included 18 framed prints, and many more unframed pieces of the completed work.

To begin, each of us created three 8”x 8” original prints, which we dubbed the first generation. Then we handed several copies of these prints to the other two artists, to add their own imprints, or second generation. A final passing of the prints, or third generation, completed each original print. In the end, we all had printed once on each final image. We also agreed to use a different printmaking method on each successive print to show the diversity of printmaking methods. This challenged us further in our image making.

Shown below are three more of the completed prints, each with our own unique signature, making a cohesive whole:

club-moss
Club Moss
dillweed
Dill Weed
grasshopper-legs
Grasshopper Legs

100 Dresses Project

Posted on December 3rd, 2016 by Anne Garland

cage-dress

Opening of the Cage Dress; © 2016 Anne Garland

The 100 Dresses Project

November 4th through December 14th 2016
Waynflete Art Gallery
360 Spring Street; Portland, Maine

I recently participated in the exhibition created and curated by artist Crystal Cawley (www.crystalcawley.com). Cawley was inspired by the 1944 children’s book The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hundred_Dresses). The story addresses themes of acceptance, inclusion, and courage to stand up for one’s beliefs.

Cawley hand printed images of a simple dress shape with a letterpress border and title. These were then distributed to a diverse group of artists from the local community. She asked participants to read the story, embellish the dress in some way (collage, printing, drawing, painting, sewing) and then return the finished piece. The exhibition showcases the responses of 140 artists to the messages in Estes’ book, still relevant in our world today.

Below is a partial exhibition view, courtesy of Waynflete School (www.waynflete.org)

100dresses-installation

Shrubs of Northern New England Forest

Posted on December 2nd, 2016 by Anne Garland

cover

Shrubs of Northern New England Forest

Michael L. Cline

I am excited to announce the publication of Shrubs of the Northern New England Forest
by Michael Cline, executive director of the Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Albany, NH (www.tinmountain.org). Mike asked me to make sketches of certain shrubs he found difficult to photograph for this project, six of which are included in the book.

The Conway Daily Sun (www.conwaydailysun.com) reported Sept 8, 2016 of Mike and his book: “Four years in the making, the book includes beautiful photographs and sketches of both common and not so common shrubs. He wrote the guide because of his own desire to identify the shrubs of the area. When he looked for a guide, none had all the information he needed in one place, so he made it his goal to write a guide that filled the gaps.”

Below are 6 of the shrubs that I illustrated for this book

swampflycurrantshrubbycinquefoilalderleafbuckthorn

mountainflyhoneysucklesquashberryamericanblackcurrant

The Bird Project

Posted on May 30th, 2016 by Anne Garland

web-birds

The Bird Project: 50 Bird Portraits

June 2 thru July 30
Tin Mountain Conservation Center
1245 Bald Hill Road, Conway, NH
FMI: www.tinmountain.org, or 603.447.6991

Artist Reception

June 7th 4:30-6:00
Followed by Tin Mountain Bird Society Meeting at 6:00; All are welcome!

About the Bird Project

The presentation of this body of work is my Final Project requirement for certification as a Tin Mountain Naturalist with the Tin Mountain Conservation Center in Conway, NH (www.tinmountain.org). The paintings were not at first intended for this project, but evolved over a period of time. It is now important to me to share the work, explain how it evolved, and what it has meant.

The first bird portraits were inspired when I assisted in caring for orphaned and injured birds at the Elaine Connors Center for Wildlife in Madison, NH. Their fragile lives were literally in the hands of staff and volunteers. In response to such intimate and profoundly moving experiences with these birds, I began painting portraits of the different species I cared for: Bluebird, Cedar Waxwing, King Bird, Chimney Swift, Robin, Canada Goose, Mallard, and Crow.

As time went on, I observed birds in their natural environment with a keener interest and passion, and continued painting their portraits. I use the term “portrait” because they are not intended to be illustrations. My purpose is to convey something felt when I observed a particular bird. They are individuals to me, each holding something unique and endearing in their wildness of spirit, expressing a life force in their eyes and posturing.

The closer I looked, the more apparent specifics such as beak shape and function, feather color and pattern became. I indulged in emphasizing “kinds” of grays, blacks, browns, yellows, blues, whites, and so on as I painted them. Variations amongst birds are infinite, including age, season observed, gender, flight patterns, habitat, and song. Although common knowledge to experienced birders, to become aware of these distinctions for the first time has been and will continue to be thrilling.

Reading about each species and paying attention to details has been enriching, sharpening my identification skills. But most importantly, by observing a bird first hand and then painting it, something vital enters me, ensuring a deep and lasting connection.

Art of the Hand-Pulled Print: Peregrine Press at 25

Posted on May 21st, 2016 by Anne Garland

Raven, © 2015 Anne Garland

Art of the Hand-Pulled Print: Peregrine Press at 25

Featuring fine art prints by current and former members, this exhibition showcases a wide variety of contemporary and historical printmaking techniques and highlights a commitment to non-toxic processes.

Lewis Gallery of the Portland Public Library
May 6 — June 25 2016

Opening Reception: Friday, May 6, from 5:00 to 8:00 PM

First Friday Reception: Friday, June 3, from 5:00 to 8:00 PM

Pressing Onward: The Hand-Pulled Print in a Digital World

Panel discussion with:
Karen Adrienne, Circling the Square Fine Art Press
Liz Chalfin, Zea Mays Printmaking
, Sid Hurwitz, Boston Printmakers

Rines Auditorium, Portland Public Library
Wednesday, May 25, at 6:00 PM

Lois Dodd Workshop

Posted on October 11th, 2015 by Anne Garland

dodd-marsh#3-275dodd-Tree-Out-Window-199h

I recently attended a plein-air painting workshop with Lois Dodd. She was accompanied by her long time friend and accomplished painter Elizabeth O’Reilly. It was an energizing week, rich with valuable critiques of our work. We discussed issues concerning the making of a painting, and Lois and Elizabeth generously shared insights into their own work.

Above and below are some of the paintings I did. The first two days on the marsh were perfect plein-air weather. The last three were drenching rain, but we had shelter, windows to paint from, and camaraderie to keep us inspired.

dodd-Mallets-199h

Top from left to right:
Marsh #3, 7.5”x10.25”, oil/canvas
Tree From Window, 12”x12”, oil/board
Below:
Mallets, 6.5”x11.5”, oil/canvas

Nests

Posted on January 28th, 2015 by Anne Garland

nest-weave1nest-weave2

I have been enjoying weaving “nest-like” shapes from plant materials I find while on my walks. I use the “random weave” technique, which has no pattern or formula that can be repeated or reproduced. As the weaving progresses, they become the 3-D versions of the graphite nest drawings I have worked on previously. The fibers are like the drawn line, varying in thickness and thinness, straight or twisting, loose and tight, all in a maze of interconnectedness.

Below are some completed nests made out of: grasses, lichen, orange roots, and vines

WN-grassesWN-Lichen

WN-Orange-RootsWN-Vine

A selection of Drawn Nests. Graphite on paper

01-nest602-nest14

03-nest1304-nest8